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    Thread: Spray Grease for Car door hinges ?

    1. #1

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      Spray Grease for Car door hinges ?

      Hi All,

      What type of spray grease do you use for your car door hinges and bonnet catch e.t.c ? Please advice.

      Thanks !

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      Quote Originally Posted by karteek View Post
      What type of spray grease do you use for your car door hinges and bonnet catch e.t.c ? Please advice.
      I have been using O-ring spray grease, white ceramic grease and now using Fluid-Film. They are all the same.

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      Quote Originally Posted by Indian View Post
      I have been using O-ring spray grease, white ceramic grease and now using Fluid-Film. They are all the same.
      How do I buy them in India ? Do you suggest any company products ? Thanks.

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      Quote Originally Posted by karteek View Post
      How do I buy them in India ?
      Use your friend Google....

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      Quote Originally Posted by karteek View Post
      Hi All,

      What type of spray grease do you use for your car door hinges and bonnet catch e.t.c ? Please advice.

      Thanks !
      What I do is spray Zorrik in hinges thoroughly and let it sit a minute and then clean with a cloth after that I apply SKF lithium grease(available in Rs30 pack too) but its a paste type and may not reach all the places as application is by hand, spray grease preferred for this. But even with my way the door remain fine, no screeching etc noise and last upto 8 months with ease.
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      Why not simply use WD40. It does this job well
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      Quote Originally Posted by sbhas2k View Post
      Why not simply use WD40. It does this job well
      Most of the people who used it say it's just used for lubricating temporarily and does not stay for a long time. It's application does not seem to be for actual greasing for long time but for some other lubrication. Thanks for the tip.

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      Quote Originally Posted by karteek View Post
      Originally Posted by sbhas2k


      Why not simply use WD40. It does this job well



      Most of the people who used it say it's just used for lubricating temporarily and does not stay for a long time. It's application does not seem to be for actual greasing for long time but for some other lubrication. Thanks for the tip.
      Some technical aspect on the same subject and why we shouldn't be using WD40 as a lubricant instead of grease.


      "I am being asked by others in my company to start using WD40 as a bearing lubricant. I know that this is not best practice, but I need to explain to them why. Any advice?"

      To understand how WD40 might work as a lubricant, we need to first understand its chemical composition. On the WD40 Web site, the marketing pitch lists the ingredients as "secret," but the material safety data sheet (MSDS) indicates the following: 60 to 70 percent petroleum distillates, 15 to 25 percent base oil and 2 to 3 percent carbon dioxide. So it would appear that WD40 is simply a combination of petroleum products mixed with a propellant (CO2).

      To understand the efficacy of WD40 as a lubricant for bearings, we need to compare how the formulation of WD40 differs from common lubricants designed for use with rolling element bearings. Because you don't mention the exact type of bearing or application, it's hard to be specific; however, a few general comments can be made that pertain to selecting lubricants for rolling elements bearings:

      First, the lubricant must have good oxidation resistance to resist sludge and varnish buildup at operating temperatures. While most lubricants are formulated with antioxidant additives to provide this protection, in addition to any natural protection afforded by the use of synthetic base stocks, it appears from the MSDS sheet that WD40 does not contain such additives and would likely degrade and form sludge fairly rapidly if used at even moderate operating temperatures.

      Second, you will hear it said that "viscosity is the single most important property when selecting a lubricant." This is particularly true for rolling element bearing lubrication. Viscosity selection is based on a number of factors, including bearing type (ball, cylindrical roller, etc.), speed, bearing size, load and operating temperature. It is usually selected by calculating the bearing speed factor (dN) and the projected operating temperature. Standard charts are then available to select the viscosity given the dN factor and the temperature.

      While the exact viscosity of the petroleum distillates or base oil in WD40 is unknown, from experience it has been determined that it does not have a particularly high viscosity. So unless this application is particularly high speed, operating at low to moderate temperatures, it is unlikely that WD40 contains an oil of sufficiently high viscosity to provide adequate lubrication for the rolling element/bearing raceway interface.

      One other factor to consider is that depending on bearing design, the roll/cage interface will also likely operate under hydrodynamic conditions. Under these conditions, the typical rule of thumb is for a minimum viscosity of 4 centistokes (at operating temperature) to support the load. Again, it is unlikely that WD40 would meet these requirements as a lubricant.

      Third, depending on the operating environment, the bearing will be prone to corrosion, particularly rusting. Nearly all lubricants contain specific additives called rust inhibitors to counteract this. Again, the MSDS sheet offers no evidence of such additives in WD40.

      Fourth, depending on bearing design and application, the use of anti-wear additives may be required, particularly where heavy or shock loads are present or where the application dictates possible thrust loading between the end of the rolling element and the raceway flanges. Based on the MSDS sheet, WD40 does not appear to contain such additives, which may result in fatigue and/or adhesive wear.

      Keep in mind that WD40 is manufactured and marketed as a household lubricant for those "small jobs" or as a rust remover. For these applications, it does a fine job. However, WD40 is not sold nor should it be used as a replacement for the appropriately selected lubricant for rolling element applications.
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      Quote Originally Posted by Queensyrche View Post
      Keep in mind that WD40 is manufactured and marketed as a household lubricant for those "small jobs" or as a rust remover. For these applications, it does a fine job. However, WD40 is not sold nor should it be used as a replacement for the appropriately selected lubricant for rolling element applications.
      I think that's what I quoted earlier. Do you happen to come across any genuine aerosol grease spray cans ?
      The reason why I am asking is that when I got my car serviced recently they greased few points on car and charged around 50 INR.
      This job can be done by us easily if we can buy the spray cans ourselves.

    10. #10
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      The likes of WD40 use kerosene . A radio tech uses WD40 to clean contacts in a volume pot .
      Why not use gear oil in a spray can for oiling the hinges ? It works for me

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