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    Thread: Recovery gear and techniques in offroading

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      Recovery gear and techniques in offroading

      D-shackles:



      This is used to connect the tow rope to the tow hook in the vehicle. The D-shackles are rated and their breaking point is usually 8 times the rated tonnage.

      Always buy a D-shackle that has its rating on it.

      To get an idea of the ratings, here is a table taken from POSIDONIA SRL - Products > Anchors > Fittings > D shackle

      Name:  dshackle.jpg
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      (from POSIDONIA SRL - Mooring and towing equipment - Home page)

      Tow ropes:



      Used to pull or snatch out a vehicle which is stuck. Notice that your snatch strap should be as shown and not with the hooks attached, as available in most places. It is safer to get your own rated D-shackes during recovery.

      Always use a rated and branded snatch strap and the tonnage rated on the strap should be at least twice the weight of your vehicle (gross), best is 3 times.

      The snatch strap is not a tow rope. The recovery using a snatch strap is done using the elastic property of the snatch strap, hence a short "snatch" is to be done by the recovery vehicle to get the "stuck" vehicle off out.

      Using a D-shackle with a snatch strap:


      How to hook up:



      When tightening the D-shackle pin, go all the way and then lossen by half a turn. This will ensure that, after a recovery, the pin and shackle are not jammed together.

      When using two snatch straps to create a longer strap, ensure to place a news paper or magazine roll between them (as shown below) to ensure that they do not bond themselves together. And yes, they do bond themselves very well if you are not careful. And do not even think of joining two straps using a D-shackle!



      IMPORTANT:
      Using a D-shackle and tow rope is a risky affair and may cause fatal injuries if precautions are not taken. Use a dampener, as a car carpet or a jute bag, over the strap to reduce the rebound in-case of a failure on the strap, shackle or on the tow point on the vehicle. And tell the audience the close-up view is not worth risking their lives - get them out of the way, at least 2 times the length of the strap.

      Tow point on the vehicles:

      The point to be used to hook on the D-shackle should be the tow point. Most people wrongly assume the tie-down point as the tow point.

      What is the tie down point? It is the hook you find on the underbody of all vehicles and which is used to tie the vehicle down during transport. The snatch point has to a point very strongly attached to the frame, either factory welded or with heavy duty bolts. Having said that, I did not find such a point in my Pajero and use the tie-down point for recovery, which is, infact, very thick and joined to the frame. So, use your judgement.

      NOTE: Image owners respective sources.

      EDIT:
      All the above based on experience; guru's are welcome to correct and help in the understanding the right process.
      Last edited by Wheels; 24th Mar 2011 at 19:48.

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      Recovery gear and techniques in offroading

      Quote Originally Posted by Frankenstein View Post
      recovery gear and techniques used
      FORD. 3.0L TDCi with 280Nm and WARN Winch. Thats all you need.

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      Wheels , why shouldnt we use a D shackle to join 2 tow ropes?

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      Before we talk about the good part, focusing on what can go wrong to drive home the risk; here is a video:




      Once the risk is understood, here is a very good video on the usage:

      Last edited by Wheels; 24th Mar 2011 at 20:43. Reason: Added additional video

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      OT - Sometimes, we forget basics stuff while doing the recovery


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      Quote Originally Posted by Frankenstein View Post
      Wheels , why shouldnt we use a D shackle to join 2 tow ropes?
      Frank,

      What had been understood by me is that in the event of the strap snapping, either side, the re-bounding D-shackle will be lethal on contact!

      Same can happen when using it on the tow hook of the vehicle, but you have the re-bound energy to take care of only a single strap, as in 50% less riskier, and is one risk you cannot avoid taking; the D-shackle + two strap is one risk you can avoid taking.
      Last edited by Wheels; 24th Mar 2011 at 20:45.

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      Here is my recovery kit, from BushRanger.

      (from Mitsubishi Pajero 3.8L V6 GLS )



      You will notice one thing I missed out to mention - Gloves! Very important, especially if you have a winch. This will help in keeping in your hands safe (obviously) but most importantly, keeping the risk of palm sweat from playing foul when handling the D-shackles.

      You can also use the carry bag as a damper on the straps.

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      Snatch Strap/KE Strap

      Quote Originally Posted by Wheels View Post
      EDIT:
      All the above based on experience; guru's are welcome to correct and help in the understanding the right process.
      Hi Wheels,

      Experience and understanding is the real "Guru", So I request you to elaborate on KE recoveries.

      "Snatch Recovery" depends a lot on technique and most importantly the Kinetic Energy Tow Strap (Snatch Strap).

      This KE/Snatch Strap is not available in INDIA, and as a result I have seen some disastrous "KE Recoveries" with ISW Rope, PP Rope, to the extent of chassis buckling, and bumper twisting away in JEEPs.

      The Tow Rope/Strap/Sling is more forgiving, but still not suited for the purpose.

      The Only time I have seen a proper Snatch/KE Recovery was in TPC2009, by the Sri-Lankan team, they used a Gyspy, to pull out an MM540, using ARB Straps.

      I would suggest you tell us in detail, how the snatch recoveries are done and approximate load calculation, slack, and acceleration.

      Regards,

      Arka
      JEEPer Speak - Engage Mind, before Opening Mouth.

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      Hello Arka,

      In the recoveries that I have experienced in Bangalore, it was mostly with the use of tow rope.


      (image taken from Great offers on hundreds of car accessories, mobility, travel and leisure products from the name you can trust.)

      In using tow rope, the usual SOP has been to gun the rescuer vehicle and keep going it till recovery is done. There is no pull-slack-pull-slack cycle with that. Disadvantage with this is that if your tow point is weak the damage is extensive.

      With snatch straps, the purpose is to use the elastic nature of the strap to do the recovery. This way, once the strap, which is fighting against being stretched, gets to the point of offering force just over the threshold force bogging the 'stuck' vehicle down, the vehicle will start coming out. This is not possible with the tow rope as the full force is transfered immediately.

      The straps are at the minimum required to be rated at least twice the weight of the vehicle being rescued, but having a tow rope at 3 times the rated weight is best. One needs to understand that when stuck you are applying the total tonnage of both the vehicles on the strap. So, if I am pulling a Safari with my Safari, that would be 2.2 + 2.2 ton's being applied on the strap. And this is just the vehicle weight; when pulling a stuck vehicle it is equivalent to pulling a heavier load, the more badly you are stuck the more tonnage being applied. So, chose your strap and recovery based on your tools.

      And, never mix different tonnage straps when making a extended strap.

      Slack required depends on how badly the vehicle is stuck and what the pre-run required is. For situations that recover just a tug to get it the vehicle out, slack is not a major concern. Check my recovery:



      In the above video, at 0.35, you will find him fixing the D-shackle. Notice how it is not fully tightened.

      At 1.35, notice the 'just enough' jerk given to pull the vehicle of its 'beached' position. If the vehicle was stuck very badly, you will need to have enough slack to be able to apply enough force on the strap to "snatch" the stuck vehicle out of it current position.

      Using snatch straps, the objective is to get the vehicle to the threshold to come out by itself.

      The speed, in my opinion, is only a supporting parameter to help in applying the load on the strap and not a primary factor. If you have a heavy vehicle, even slow speed would be able to achieve the required force, but with lighter vehicles you will need to get a good run up to apply the same force.

      On a side note, you will notice in the video above the use of the vehicle horns for communication during the snatch. This is one of those small things that goes a long way to avoid mishaps.

      Here is another BushRanger promo video which articulates the information better with regard to the straps:


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      Quote Originally Posted by Wheels View Post
      Recovery gear and techniques in offroading
      Poor girl. I bet she never knew, when she was posing, that she'd get stuffed between two kinetic straps.

      On a serious note, cant we get the equipment shown in your post ? any clue if it can be imported ?

      Quote Originally Posted by ex670c View Post
      they used a Gyspy, to pull out an MM540, using ARB Straps.
      Gypsy had enough traction to lug the MM540? Many a video show that gypsy's light weight devoids it of traction or was there something wrong in the videos ? May be the tyre tread patterns and depth ?

      Could you please elaborate ?

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